Noticeboard

FREE NHS HEALTH  CHECK
Ages 40 - 74 years?


You may be entitled to a fee NHS health check.  This health check can help to detect diabetes, high blood pressure and high  cholesterol . The check will also assess your risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the future and with the right measures can prevent these diseases.

 

To qualify for your health check you must be aged between 40 - 74 years and NOT ALREADY receiving treatment for: Heart disease, Kidney disease, stroke or diabetes

 

To arrange your free health check please contact the surgery on 01257 791216 and ask for an appointment for your diabetes and cholesterol blood test followed by an appointment with our health care assistant

 

 

Our new normal

Is my GP practice open?

Yes, your GP practice is open. You can access GP services from your GP practice. Some of the ‘traditional’ ways of working have been adapted to protect you and staff from the potential risk of coronavirus. For example, how you access your GP practice building or how your appointment is undertaken might be different.

I would like a face-to-face appointment, when can I get this?

Not all conditions need to be seen by your GP in a face to face appointment. Your GP will judge whether or not he or she needs to see you, or whether an alternative consultation is better. When contacting your GP, you will undergo an assessment (called triaging) of your needs and to determine whether you may or may not have Covid-19 symptoms. Based on this assessment your doctor or clinician will determine if you need a face-to-face appointment. If safe and appropriate to do so a member of your practice clinical team may undertake your consultation via telephone or through a video consultation. This will help to reduce the risk of coronavirus infection to you and the practice staff.

How can my condition be properly diagnosed via telephone or video?

Lots of common conditions can be diagnosed using mobile devices, telephone or video thanks to the experience of your GPs and their ability to recognise the signs and symptoms of conditions from the information you provide. However, if they judge that it is safer and more appropriate to organise a face-to-face appointment for you then this will be arranged.

What if I can’t or don’t want to use video technology for an appointment?

If for a number of reasons you aren’t able to have an appointment via video technology then your GP will arrange an alternative option – either a phone call, or a face-to-face appointment for you.

Can I still access other services from my surgery, such as ante-natal appointments for example?

Services such as ante-natal clinics, all vaccination programmes for example child and baby immunisations, and hormone injections for patients with prostate cancer have remained in place throughout the pandemic. If you are unsure what the arrangements are, please contact the service directly. Before you attend your appointment, you will be assessed to see if you have any symptoms of covid-19. The helps keep you, other patients and practice staff safe.

“Assessment first” from GP practices open and providing services

The threat of infection from Covid-19 still exists within our communities, and locally, patients are being asked to continue to follow the guidance, stick to any restrictions in place and take the necessary precautions such as wearing face coverings and practicing good hygiene.

GP practices are open and continue to provide services as they have done throughout the pandemic. This means that for patients, their GP practice is open and providing GP services.

GP practice buildings are public buildings and as such must be kept covid-secure. Your GP practice will already have a process in place for managing entry into the premises to help minimise the risk of anybody spreading the virus. Please continue to follow this.

New ways of providing GP services have been introduced in order to maintain access to your GP practice team whilst protecting you, others and staff. Triage (making an assessment of your condition and prioritising care accordingly) is an important part of how GP practices work. This has always been in place but has been vitally important during the pandemic.

Medical Director of the Chorley & South Ribble CCG said:

“GP practices are open and have been providing GP services throughout the covid-19 pandemic. They have learned during the pandemic, that they can conduct consultations very well with the vast majority of patients using digital technology. The majority of common conditions can be assessed and diagnosed by your Doctor by telephone or video consultation. They are experienced and skilled in doing this. Using technology like this will help to protect you, your family and loved ones - and GP practice staff from the potential risk of the virus".

“If your GP judges that your condition needs to a consultation in a face-to-face appointment then this will be arranged, however this will be a clinical decision by the GP based on their judgement of the absolute need to do so".

“These new ways of working provide mutual benefits to patients and your GP practice which is why before the pandemic we had a plan to start introducing these more frequently”.

"The use of these digital technologies has been shown to improve patient experiences thanks to the convenience and increased access that they provide. GPs want to make sure that these new ways of working and the benefits they bring are not lost. Covid-19 has changed many aspects of our daily lives, with lots of positive changes. These new ways of accessing your GP and receiving care or treatment are just one of those."

Face Coverings

NHS organisations in Lancashire and South Cumbria have agreed to implement new measures on the use of face masks and coverings in general practice settings.

Patients and visitors are asked to wear a face mask or face covering. Face coverings are different to face masks in that they can be homemade, made of cloth, and be reusable after being washed.

If a patient or visitor does not have a face covering or face mask when they come to a service, they will be provided with a face mask on arrival.

Where do I go for more information? If you have further questions on our local plans to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 across Lancashire and South Cumbria visit www.healthierlsc.co.uk/covid

What does this mean for me?

We can all play a role in reducing the spread of coronavirus and keeping our NHS services safe. If you are coming to an NHS service as a patient or visitor, it is important that you wear a face covering at all times. This is for your safety and the safety of other patients and staff.

Face coverings can be cloth and/or homemade, and advice on how to wear and make one can be found on the government website www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering

Face coverings worn as part of religious beliefs or cultural practice are also acceptable, providing they are not loose and cover the mouth and nose.

We are asking that you plan in advance and bring a face covering with you whenever possible, but if you do not have one available when you come to a service, you will be provided with a face mask on arrival.

If you are currently shielding and have been provided with a surgical face mask for your appointments, please continue to use this.

If you have not been provided with a surgical face mask, you should wear a face covering.

For some people, wearing a face covering may be difficult due to physical or mental health conditions. In these instances, other measures will be considered on a case by case basis, for example timed appointments and being seen immediately on arrival.

If you are a deaf or hearing impaired, our staff have a range of communication options to ensure that they can communicate effectively with you. This might include the use of clear masks where possible, as well as visual aids such as writing things down, speech to text apps and sign language.

All visitors will be expected to comply with existing social distancing and hand hygiene measures in addition to the face coverings while in the general practice setting.

Where do I go for more information? If you have further questions regarding the changes we have made across primary and community services in Lancashire and South Cumbria visit www.healthierlsc.co.uk/covid .

Why are we asking visitors/patients visiting the site to wear face coverings?

Patients and visitors coming to general practice services in Lancashire and South Cumbria will need to wear face coverings to reduce the risk of transmitting coronavirus to others.

Evidence has shown that those infected with COVID-19 can have very mild or no respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic) and potentially transmit the virus to others without being aware of it Patients and visitors are advised to bring a face covering ahead of coming to appointments in general practice.

The use of face coverings in GP practices is a local decision to help protect public and staff and is not national PHE guidance.

What happens if a patient/visitor does not have a face covering when they come to a GP surgery? If a patient or visitor does not have a face covering, a mask will be provided on arrival.

How do we communicate this new rule to patients and visitors? The need for patients and visitors to wear a face covering when visiting general practice should be communicated through appointment letters / texts / emails, social media, local news stations/papers and through signage displayed at entrances to premises and throughout patient areas. Staff will use any opportunity to inform patients of the rationale for face coverings.

What does this mean for shielding patients? For those patients who are currently shielding, and who have been provided with a surgical face mask for their appointments, these should be worn. Where not already provided, patients should wear a face covering.

What about cloth/homemade/donated face masks? Patient and visitor face coverings can be cloth and/or homemade www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering

All visitors will be expected to comply with social/physical distancing and the recommended hand hygiene measures.

Does my face covering worn for religious beliefs/cultural practice qualify? Face coverings worn as part of religious beliefs or cultural practice are acceptable, providing they are not loose and cover the mouth and nose.

Letter to our patients

Click here to view this letter

Covid-19 advice

If you have symptoms of a new, continuous cough and/or a high temperature and/or loss of taste and smell please stay at home and self isolate for at least 7 days. If you need medical help contact NHS 111 online at https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19, if you do not have access to the internet you can call 111.

For life-threatening emergencies, call 999 for an ambulance

You can find a wide range of Covid-19 advice at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-list-of-guidance#guidance-for-the-public

Important advice for parents

https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2020-04/covid19_advice_for_parents_when_child_unwell_or_injured_poster.pdf

 

What to do if you think you have coronavirus?

If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or a new, continuous cough), use the 111 coronavirus service.

If you need help or advice not related to coronavirus:

Fit Notes (Sick notes)

Absence from work may fall into five categories:

  1. Personally affected – isolating for seven days
  2. Personally affected - remaining unwell for over seven days
  3. Household member affected – isolating for fourteen days as per government advice
  4. At risk group – following government advice
  5. Those in full time education

You should self-certify for the first seven days as normal if you are unfit to work. You do not need to contact your GP.

  1. Personally affected - remaining unwell for over seven days

If you remain unwell and unfit to work after seven days, visit www.111.nhs.uk and complete an online self-assessment. You do not need to contact your GP.

  1. Household member affected – isolating for fourteen days as per government advice

    4. At risk group – following government advice

Employers are responsible for putting in place arrangements for home/remote working where this is possible. Where it is not, you may self-certify and return to work following the relevant absence which your employer may authorise as per government advice. Where you do become unwell during or after this time, point 1 and 2 applies. You do not need to contact your GP.

  1. Those in full time education

There is no requirement to issue certification to schools or colleges to confirm absence. These organisations must work with parents and students to ensure that any absence is appropriately recorded. You do not need to contact your GP.



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website